Cardigan

HISTORY:

Pembrokes and Cardigans first appeared together in dog shows in 1925 when they were shown under the rules of The Kennel Club in Britain. The Corgi Club was founded in December, 1925 in Carmarthen in South Wales. It is reported that the local members favored the Pembroke breed, so a club for Cardigan enthusiasts was founded a year later (1926). Both groups have worked hard to ensure the appearance and type of breed are standardized through careful selective breeding. Pembrokes and Cardigans were officially recognized by the Kennel Club in 1928 and were lumped together under the heading Welsh Corgis. In 1934, the two breeds were recognized individually and shown separately.

TEMPERMENT:

Originally bred for farm work, including herding sheep and cattle. Cardigan Welsh corgis were bred long and low to make sure that any kicks by cattle would travel safely over the dogs' heads without touching them. Known as "a big dog in a small package," Cardigans are highly intelligent, active, athletic dogs. They have proven themselves as excellent companion animals. Cardigans are affectionate, devoted companions that can also be alert and responsible guardians. If socialized at a young age, they can be nice with other dogs and housepets. Some Cardigan corgis are 'one-man dogs'. They are competitive in sheepdog trials, dog agility, competitive obedience and rally obedience. Cardigans are typically excellent watchdogs, as they are highly alert to the approach of strangers to their territory, and will be very vocal until they and/or their owner are assured that the stranger poses no threat. They tend to be wary of strangers and to reserve their affection for a select few with whom they are familiar.

APPEARENCE:

The Cardigan is a long, low dog with upright ears and a fox brush tail. The old American Kennel Club standard called it an "Alsatian on short legs". The Cardigan's tail is long (unlike the Pembroke Welsh corgi, whose tail may be long, naturally bobbed or docked. Cardigans come in a variety of colors including any shade of red, sable, or brindle, as well as black, with or without tan, brindle or blue merle, with or without tan or brindle points. Other unofficial colors can occur, such as red merle, but these colors are not considered acceptable per the Cardigan standard. They usually have white on the neck, chest, legs, muzzle, underneath, tip of the tail and as a blaze on the head, known as the "Irish pattern." Other markings include ticking on the legs and muzzle, smutty muzzles and monk's hoods, especially on sables (a pattern of darker tipped hairs over a basic red coat color. An average Cardigan is around 10.5 to 13 inches (260 to 315 mm) tall at the withers and weighs from 30 to 38 lb. (13.6 to 17.2 kg) for the male and 25 to 34 lb. (11.3 to 15.4 kg) for the female.

Information from Wikipedia for educational purposes only.

Cardigan Coat colors

     

Shown above are a few of the many coat colors of Cardigan Welsh Corgis.

Left to Right: Red brindle, black brindle, blue merle with tan points

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